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Bhavesh Joshi India’s first original Superhero

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In the modern cinematic era, superhero films have taken for a significant part of the film industry with the emergence of two mega franchisee MCU and DCEU. Amidst the mavericks, enters an Indian superhero, Bhavesh Joshi (apparently India’s first original) which goes unnoticed by the Indian audience as usual. While it may not be a game-changer, it definitely has more potential and is a sincere effort to create something fresh and original.

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Bhavesh Joshi Superhero takes on the subject of the same good vs evil (mostly in black and white) apart from exploring some grey elements. A need for a superhero (read: outlaw) arises when the system fails to function normally. In this case, it is depicted with Mumbai’s corrupt politicians taking charge of the entire city’s waterline using it for their personal benefits and depriving the citizens of their basic needs. Bhavesh Joshi, a young resident of Malad believes it is up to him to cleanse the dirt off the society. Sadly, his idealistic journey is brought to an end by the politicians. It is then that Bhavesh’s friend (played by Harshvardhan Kapoor) dons a suit with a mask and takes up the name Bhavesh Joshi (in memoriam). Vikramaditya Motwane stylistically portrays Mumbai as he uses colors and lights to a large effect, whilst also taking shots in the grim and shoddy lanes of Mumbai (like he says he knows his city well). Perfectly understanding the visual aesthetics he mostly shot the action sequences using wide angle lenses. The action sequences are neatly choreographed with keeping in mind the realism where the superhero both beats and gets beaten. The story takes slight references from both Batman and Daredevil while keeping its own essence intact. The plot starts with a lighter tone and never rushes off, letting it build on itself and actually giving a purpose to create the need of a superhero!

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Largely underlooked by the theatrical audience, it might get a nod in the digital streaming platforms (Netflix and Hotstar). While it may not be a huge cinematic achievement it certainly has the potential to build on a franchise paving way for subsequent original superhero films in India.

About the author

Arijit Paul

A self-professed Satyajit Ray fan, Arijit is one of those rare cinephiles who has an unconventional notion of Films. An admirer of auteurs like Kurosawa, Bergman and Scorsese alike, Arijit hopes that one day he will be able to bring a new wave in Indian cinema. Apart from films, he finds life in literature, music and traveling. His blogs are likely to be the most unprejudiced view on whatever topic he decides to write on.

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